Abbas A Jowkar, MBBS

Abbas A Jowkar, MBBS
Abbas A Jowkar, MBBS

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine


Biosketch

Contact Information

WMed
1000 Oakland Drive
Kalamazoo, MI 49008
Administrative:
Department of Medicine
269.337.6365
abbas.jowkar@med.wmich.edu

Abbas Jowkar, MD, is a board-certified neurologist with Bronson Neuroscience Center - Kalamazoo. He earned his medical degree from Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College in Gulbarga, India. He completed a residency in neurology with Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. He has also completed a fellowship in neurophysiology from Wayne State University, as well as on in neuromuscular medicine with University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, South Carolina.

Dr. Jowkar chose neuromuscular care because he has always been fascinated and awed by the complexity of neurosciences. He has a special interest in electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular medicine as it encompasses an assessment of the entire neuraxis, as well as neuromuscular disorders.

  • Board Certification

    • American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (Neurology)
  • Education and Training

    • Fellowship 2019, Neuromuscular Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    • Fellowship 2015, Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Wayne State University
    • Residency 2014, Neurology, Wayne State University
    • MS 2005, Physician Assistant Studies, Wayne State University
    • MBBS 1989, Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College
  • Research

    • Neuromuscular Diseases
    • Clinical Neurology
  • Publications

    • Sriwastava S., Kataria S., Tandon M., Patel J., Patel R., Jowkar A., Daimee M., Bernitsas E., Jaiswal P., Lisak R.P. Guillain Barré Syndrome and its variants as a manifestation of COVID-19: A systemic review of case report and case series Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2021;420 doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2020.117263.

    • Sriwastava S., Srinivas M., Kanna A., Yarraguntla K., Jowkar A., George E. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD) syndromes may have more aggressive disease course in African Americans and early onset of presentation compare to Caucasians group eNeurologicalSci. 2019;17 doi: 10.1016/j.ensci.2019.100208.